Seljavallalaug: A hidden gem in South Iceland

Seljavallalaug (e. Seljvavellir pool) is one of those places many visitors in Iceland miss because they are busy checking off all the highlights of the south on their Been There Done That list. It’s nestled in a narrow valley below the infamous Eyjafjallajökull and it’s the oldest pool in Iceland that is still standing. It was built in 1923 by some visionaries that wanted to provide the locals with a place where they could learn how to swim. Unlike today, where Icelanders won’t graduate school without passing a swim test, most Icelanders didn’t know how to swim in the beginning of the 1900s which was a problem since many of them lived off fishing. It was important to get these things in order and those who built this pool knew that.

Today I believe the pool is mostly maintained by volunteers and of donations but you can still very much swim in it while enjoying the spectacular surroundings. It’s built next to a rock wall that makes up one of its four walls and the water comes from a natural hot spring close by. It’s 25 meters long, 10 meters wide, and even offers dressing rooms where you can change but no showers. There is no entry fee and you are asked to treat it with care and respect but alcohol consumption is strictly forbidden. I don’t think you want to be wasted in that location with something happening and no life guard anyway!

Walking towards Seljavallalaug

Walking towards Seljavallalaug

The changing rooms at Seljavallalaug

The changing rooms

Seljavallalaug

The pool itself

Helga enjoyed the pool!

Helga enjoyed the pool!

 

On the way back to the car

On the way back to the car

The landscape in the valley is pretty intense

The landscape in the valley is pretty intense

Jumping over a stream

Jumping over a stream

How to get to Seljavallalaug

When you are driving in the direction from Reykjavík you turn of the ring road (No.1) into road 242 marked Raufarfell. It’s just past Þorvaldseyri (The Iceland Erupts exhibition) so make sure you don’t miss it (like we did). You drive until you see a sign that says Seljavellir but if you follow that road you get to a new pool that was built later where you can park. From the car park you walk for 15-20 minutes towards the bottom of the valley and in the end you will see the pool peaking behind a corner. You can’t see it until you get to it so if you think you’re going the wrong way you probably aren’t. You will have to jump over a little stream and the way is a bit uneven but it’s an easy walk and everyone should be able to do it.

It’s been a few years since I was there last time and I’m sure that the access to the pool changed a bit in the eruption because it didn’t look anything like I remembered. So if you have a guide book that says it has a nice trail to it and you feel confused when you don’t find it – don’t worry about it. It’s there!

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13 thoughts on “Seljavallalaug: A hidden gem in South Iceland

  1. Sarah

    One of my favorite places in the world. Plus your sister looks unbelievably beautiful in that one picture!

    Reply
  2. Anna

    Been there, done that, enjoyed it! It was already on our list of things we were hoping to do, and we made it. Thanks for the extra tips :) Ps. We’re in Reykjavik again Wednesday evening to Friday morning before flying back home.

    Reply
  3. Wilson

    I was there today, thanks to your suggestion. That’s an amazing place, in such a beautiful valley, it was well worth the walk. Thank you so much for leading me there!

    Reply
  4. mathieu

    Place looks great! We are planning a january trip, is this place accessible by foot without a guide during the winter time?
    Cheers
    Mathieu

    Reply
    • Auður Post author

      It probably depends on the weather – I’m actually not sure how safe it is. You definitely have to take into consideration the limited light (so if you are there in the afternoon you might be going back in pitch black). I also don’t know how the road up there is in winter. It should be OK if the weather is fine but take precautions.

      Reply
  5. Matt

    Thanks for telling us about this amazing spot. We arrived late morning after a mild snowfall (3 or 4 cm) and my wife was a bit dubious about directions to “Park at the pool and walk up the valley for 20 minutes” but we lucked out with an Icelandic guide. After we parked our car, a beautiful black dog came down the hill to say Hi and then ran 50 meters up the valley and turned her head as if to say “this way!”. She lead us straight to the pool (taking a more direct route than the set of prints we could see in the snow from an earlier visitor) and then sat next to the pool for half an hour while we swam. After we dressed, she lead us back to the car and then ran up the homes to the west.

    Thanks for providing us with a tip that lead to one of the best experiences of our trip, it was magical!

    Reply
  6. Jennie

    This sounds so exciting- I love the pictures from the pool! How is the weather now- do you think it is accessable now in October? Im leaving for Iceland in 1 week (yippeeeeee!!).

    Reply
    • Auður Post author

      It’s accessible as long as the weather is OK (there are often storms around this time of year that don’t scream out “go hike and get naked in nature). The pool is not that warm though so I don’t know if I would get in if it was really cold – there’s one spot where the water comes in where it is warmer but I was there this summer and there were some people there that were just cold.

      Reply

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